About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
SFGTV 118
LANGUAGE
English 118
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)
of transportation regulars conference last week and i heard the city of new york is planning on issuing a request a proposal for drivers healthcare. in order to increase the level of coverage. i want to talk to new york city and other jurisdictions about leveraging multiple cities populations of taxi drivers to bring rates down and provide health care for san francisco taxi drivers. >> chairman nolan: what is the rate at which the fund is growing? >> we started a pilot program, approximately 1 million dollars a year. we started the pilot program in late 2010. i cannot say with any accuracy what would happen when old medallions become transferable. that is what is happening now. >> chairman nolan: i am interested in that. that would be a wonderful thing to be able to do that. mr. -- point about being at a level, middle level, i would be interested in seeing that. >> a lot of the cabdrivers have talked about sort of the other challenges that they face in their industry, corruption may be within the cap companies, maybe with non-driving drivers holding the down is required to drive, compet
,000, the size of a new york city police department. the public safety and security are always major concerns for the coast guard. while some coast guard men and men will celebrate in fleet week, most will be on duty performing their job protecting the public, and the environment in and around san francisco. with partnership with state and local partners. we recognize the services of the fleet week members, past and present. ladies and gentlemen, you will witness sailors and marines on the decks of their ship in their uniforms. this is manning the rails and one of the oldest traditions from hundreds of years ago. today members are stationed along the rail to honor ceremonies. the most common is visiting a port not recently visitd and home, departing for or returning from a visit. this started in 1908 when the great white fleet visited this city. in 1981, dyane finestein started fleet week. it remains a grand celebration with the parade of ships. today, san francisco fleet week serves as a mechanism for urban preparedness and partnerships with local and state agencies. this provides the united
something about housing first a while ago, this started in new york city called pathways to housing about 20 years ago. and the idea there was prior to this, let's get people ready to housing and then let's get them into housing. that never ever happened with any kind of regularity because people were so badly disabled and the idea they would get better on the streets was frankly a ludicrous idea. the national conversation shifted about two decades ago, the notion of let's get people housed first and then we'll work with them on their disabilities has been not only at local levels but also on the federal level what's been promoted and over the last 8 it 9 years, so that's what we tried to do. and at that point, you know, the mainstream housing developers, the affordable housing producers which this town has many incredible affordable housing producers were well-known for as small a town as we are the number of good housing, affordable housing producers, they weren't at all convinced that having people who had been homeless for 10 and 15 years and who have 3 and 4 chronic health issues on t
association of transportation regulars conference last week and i heard the city of new york is planning on issuing a request a proposal for drivers healthcare. in order to increase the level of coverage. i want to talk to new york city and other jurisdictions about leveraging multiple cities
-finance improvements. we have found where new york city did accomplish that, but it's on a much grander scale. so if there is the possibility perhaps to bundle properties, that might get us enough heft of what we want in debt, and perhaps get a decent return but for small agreements it's very difficult to do anything other than what we're presenting to you at this 8% rate. we are -- i do want to make mention though that our rough order of magnitude budget at this point has us considerably below what our availability of funds is at 35 a square foot, we're probably 80% of that and we're seeing already value engineering opportunities where that number will only go lower. but in abundance of caution we're providing you numbers that assume full amortization of the entire 35 a square foot. >> president chiu: supervisor campos. >> supervisor campos: thank you, mr. president. thank you for your presentation. just a quick question, just an informational question. there is a way to keep track of how much the city is spending on these kinds of improvements, collectively? i don't know how many of these deals
anything we're have to rethink what we're doing. everybody points to new york city as an example of what is right with the cab industry. you have an area half of the size of san francisco. you have 10 times the number of cabs. i was there in may and i took a lot of cabs and i always talk to the drivers and they average about $27,000 a year because the medallions are out of the range of them afford one. they work long hours. it's a great town to get a cab in but a bad town to drive a taxi in. i was asked twice where are we going? we're going to tenth and 40th and you don't know how to get there. that's horrible and if they take the medallions and give them to the company over time this is a [inaudible] dollar an hour of job and 20 years from now when everyone is wondering what happened to the cab industry and you guys are our only hob at the moment and we're asking to you take a look at this. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> ladies and gentlemen, good evening. my name is ms. macary and have been driving 33 years in san francisco, and i have a question for you guys. this cab
we are going to make a change that is this radical, -- new york city as i understand it file piling one project on city land to see how it works this is not one the 375 units, we are talking about four-six projects and i might say it might really help not with affordable housing but with moderate mousing and i think that is scott wieners place on this and i think it might help but i think so it will open up a whole a lot of loopholes and i think we should go slowly and so one thing that we learned during the presidential campaign is the problem of math and so one thing that i would like to propose propose to you is the mathematical campaign so you divide in a by 30 days and what that comes out to is $50 a night i. simple math. if you think about that,that is pretty cheap per night and now imagine for a moment, here we go. so $1,500 a month works out to $50 a night and let's say that you charge $99 a night it's a teen hundred dollars and then 4,000 a month. and so now, you are holding one of these buildings and trying to figure out what do to satisfy your investors there will be a
architecture projects. the new york city high line is famous with number 3, hayes valley farm was number 2. gazillion airplane magazine, what to do in san francisco. german interview with the national geographic. san francisco lonely planet feature is one of the top things to do. so, it gives a lot of attention. if i can just -- can i take another minute? it came together out of the whole series of public input and a lot of support from the mayor's office of economic work force development and the merchants association and the neighborhood association and the local residents and we'd like to see that kind of community input and partnership when we consider what happens with parcel o in the future. i'm part of the leadership of hayes valley farm and i do want to make it very clear we are champions of interim youth. we are excited about moving off [speaker not understood] and we are fully intending to do that for parcel p and parcel o we would like more interim use possibilities. thank you. >> thank you. >>> hi, my name is jay. my dog callie is here with me. i wanted to take a moment to cons
to the neighborhood it has a national -- it gets national, international attention. we've been in the new york times twice. it has cement san francisco's reputation as the greenest city on earth. we are one of the top 10 city parks in sunset magazine. we have been [speaker not understood] we're in the huffington post as top it was like the 7 coolest architecture projects or recycled architecture projects. the new york city high line is famous with number 3, hayes valley farm was number 2. gazillion airplane magazine, what to do in san francisco. german interview with the national geographic. san francisco lonely planet feature is one of the top things to do. so, it gives a lot of attention. if i can just -- can i take another minute? it came together out of the whole series of public input and a lot of support from the mayor's office of economic work force development and the merchants association and the neighborhood association and the local residents and we'd like to see that kind of community input and partnership when we consider what happens with parcel o in the future. i'm part of the leaders
in our legislation and have decided to include in our ledthtion asian a provision in new york city administrative code. this will require a property owner or property manager to disclose to prospective tenants written disclosure of the bed bug infestation and abatement history only upon request. third, we require pest control operators to report to dph on a monthly basis the number of units they have treated in order for the city to have a better sense of how to manage its response to the issue both in neighborhoods which infestation seems to be increasing and prioritizing our limited staff resources to where the need is. currently we only collect data based on complaints, which doesn't give us a good sense of where the bed bug fib if he is thaitions are -- infestations are. by mandating pest control operators report to the dph we'll have a broader sense where the infestations are. this will have a data driven use of our resources. i believe the approach practice in collaboration with dph and the working group that has been working on this issue for over three years is both measure
, and there's huge studies that come out of new york city and upenn and so forth that demonstrate over and over again it doesn't cost any more to house someone in supportive housing than to leave them homeless when you factor in the hospital care costs, the ambulance costs, the jail time costs and so forth. and those aren't easy things to just neatly unravel and get the jail to start giving us all their money and the hospital to start giving us all their money. it's not as simple as it sounds but when you do look at that, that is the fact that in many cases it doesn't cost any more to house someone decently in housing than to leave them homeless. and if you just look at what our average cost per month to house someone in supportive housing, it's about $1500, and that equals -- that's one month in supportive housing, or two days at san francisco general hospital inpatient, less than one day in the icu, 3 visits to the ed, and 5 days in residential drug treatment. and in many of these places, well in almost all of those, even when you do incur all those costs, the person is still homel
of the family. it's a wonderful place. i just want to remind people that in central park in new york city, itbnpic¢Ñ a restaurant, is called tavern on the green. it hasn't made central park into some sort of ugly slum. thank you. >> supervisor farrell: thank you. next speaker, come on up. >> my name's bill bowles, i've lived in san francisco for 10 years and known the mcnifns for maybe 20 years. i agree with the previous speaker here. you know, there's only one beach chalet. there's only one cliffhouse. there's only one ferry building, and one warming hut. it's important that those places are run well. and they are. and they're not a place with -- the beach chalet is not a place with drunks roaming around late at night. it's actually a great san francisco icon. the ferry building as well. and with this degaussing station there's opportunity to make that place, which is currently empty, a new spot for locals and for tourists to gravitate to. and the mcnifns are an amazing family, and they are great restaurant owners. i've seen three different restaurants that they have owned, all with differe
in new york city that is undergoing significant development. so, i have all of the same concerns in the area where i live and i take them very seriously and so do we all. but we are trying to create a situation that will alleviate those fears and concerns and at the same time provide economic development and job growth for the neighborhood for the city and the region. we're focused on making this a place where families and other people of the neighborhood and the city can enjoy themselves. and the space that is today a surface parking lot of about three acres in a degrading concrete pier. this is something we all feel we can only improve the quality of life, the property and social values of the neighborhood as we take the concerns of those nearby to heart. thank you very much. >> thank you, mr. dikers. i actually just had a couple of comments, more comments than questions. i just want to express -- by the way, thank you so much for the presentation. the design is beautiful, and i thank the comments and feedback that we got. there is general consensus that it was presented to the
. obviously, commissioner, if you feel differently. new york city i just wanted to know if you were vetting all five or the three in yellow. so, we're doing the three in yellow? >> yes. >> i would vet we do the three in yellow and come back next month -- >> final recommendation. we'd be happy to do that. >> so, is this an action item? >> no. >> okay, all right. thank you so much. once again, thanks for all of your help and efficiency. i know you have very little work to do over there. [laughter] >> i would just want to add, as we look at our matrix for vetting folks, i would also like to know about their staff. our mayor has just negotiated a wonderful relationship with the warriors coming to do business in our town. we'd like to know how people are going to play our folks as they do business in our town. so, i'd like to have that as part of what gets laid out. >> both in terms of who is going to be assigned, who is going to be their back office, how that works, who that gets let out to. so on and so forth. thank you. next. >> do we have any public comment on item number 5? >>> commissioner
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)